Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Puget Sound Railway Historical Association in August 1998

Weyerhaeuser Timber Company H12-44 #1 in Snoqualmie, Washington, in August 1998

I took these pictures in August 1998, at the Puget Sound Railway Historical Association (now the Northwest Railway Museum) in Snoqualmie, Washington, where our family stopped briefly on a trip to Stevens Pass. Weyerhaeuser Timber Company #1 is a 1200-horsepower H12-44 that was built by Fairbanks-Morse of Beloit, Wisconsin, in 1951. This locomotive was originally used by Weyerhaeuser on the White River Branch, a 4-mile logging line that ran from Enumclaw to a site called Upper Mill. A few years after the locomotive was acquired, the logging line was supplanted with trucks, and the locomotive was used only to interchange freight cars with the Northern Pacific and the Milwaukee Road. This operation ceased in 1975, and the locomotive was transferred to Weyerhaeuser's operation at Vail, Washington, and was renumbered to #714. It was retired in 1977 and sold to Pacific Transportation Services of Tacoma, Washington, where it became #121. It was leased to Continental Grain in Tacoma in the 1980s before being purchased by the Puget Sound Railway Historical Association in 1987.

Alco RSD-4 #201 in Snoqualmie, Washington, in August 1998

Kennecott Copper Company #201 is an RSD-4 built by the American Locomotive Company (Alco) in 1951. A total of 36 RSD-4s were built from 1951 to 1952, compared to 204 RSD-5s built from 1952 to 1956, which were identical except for the main generator. This was the only RSD-4 purchased by Kennecott Copper and is the only remaining RSD-4 in existence. It was donated to the Puget Sound Railway Historical Association in 1983.

GE 45-Tonner #7320 in Snoqualmie, Washington, in August 1998

45-Tonner #7320 was built by General Electric in 1941. It was originally used in the construction of the Elwood Ordinance Plant in Wilmington, Illinois by contractors Sanderson & Porter. It was later transferred to the U.S. Army Transportation Corps and became #7320. It was transferred to the U.S. Navy around 1956 for use at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Washington. After it was retired, the Puget Sound Railway Historical Association leased it from Washington State Parks in 1976.

Northern Pacific Rotary Snow Plow #10 in Snoqualmie, Washington, in August 1998

Northern Pacific Railway #10 is a steam-powered rotary snow plow that was built by the American Locomotive Company's Cooke Works in Paterson, New Jersey, in November, 1907. This rotary plow spent its career assigned to clear winter snow in Washington's Stampede Pass. It was retired in 1964 and was donated to the Puget Sound Railway Historical Association by the Northern Pacific in 1968.

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Mt. Rainier Scenic Railroad in August 1998

Hammond Lumber Company 2-8-2T #17 at Elbe, Washington, in August 1998

I took these pictures at the Mount Rainier Scenic Railroad in Elbe, Washington, in August 1998, where our family stopped briefly on a trip to Stevens Pass. The Mount Rainier Scenic Railroad was established in 1981 on seven miles of the former Tacoma Eastern Railroad, a one-time subsidiary of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad, also known as the Milwaukee Road. After the Milwaukee Road abandoned its western lines on February 29, 1980, the former Tacoma Eastern was taken over by the Weyerhaeuser Corporation. The Mount Rainier Scenic Railroad operates tourist trains between the towns of Elbe and Mineral.

Hammond Lumber Company 2-8-2T #17 at Elbe, Washington, in August 1998

Hammond Lumber Company #17 is a 2-8-2T that was built by the American Locomotive Company in Schenectady, New York, in September, 1929, as Crossett Western Co. #11 for use in Wauna, Oregon. In 1943, it was sold to the Hammond Lumber Company in Samoa, California, where is operated as #17. A forest fire in 1945 destroyed some of the logging railroad trestles and stranded the locomotive in the woods, where it was abandoned as the company did not consider it worth recovering. It was still there when Hammond Lumber was purchased by Georgia-Pacific in October 1956. In June 1965, the locomotive was sold to Gus Peterson of Klamath, California, who recovered it from the woods for use on his Klamath & Hoppow Valley Railroad, where it operated as #17 into the 1970s. In October 1982, it was sold to the Western Washington Forest Industries Museum and moved to the Mount Rainier Scenic Railroad. It was restored to operation in 1994.

Pickering Lumber Company 3-Truck Heisler #10 at Elbe, Washington, in August 1998

Pickering Lumber Company #10 is a 3-Truck Heisler that was originally built by the Heisler Locomotive Works of Erie, Pennsylvania, in May, 1912, as Blue Jay Lumber Company #10, named P.J. Lynch. This was the first successful 3-truck Heisler ever built, and would be the only 78-ton Heisler ever built. In May of 1919 it was sold to the Edward Hines Lumber Company in Lumberton, Mississippi. Later, it was sold to the Standard Lumber Company in Standard, California where is operated as #10. The Standard Lumber Company became the Pickering Lumber Company in 1926, and then the Pickering Lumber Corporation in March 1937. In January 1958, the locomotive was sold for scrap to the Connel Motor Truck Company in Stockton, California. In June 1966, it was donated to the Pacific Southwest Railway Museum Association, and was sold in December 1966 to Gus Peterson for his Klamath & Hoppow Valley Railroad where it operated as #10. In October 1982, it was sold to the Western Washington Forest Industries Museum and moved to the Mount Rainier Scenic Railroad in Elbe, where it was placed on static display, lettered for the Silver Creek Logging Company and named R.J. "Bud" Kelly.

Hammond Lumber Company 2-8-2T #17 at Elbe, Washington, in August 1998

Here is another picture of Hammond Lumber Company 2-8-2T #17 being serviced in Elbe for its next excursion trip to Mineral.

1944-1945 GMC CCKW 2.5-Ton 6x6 Cargo Truck at Elbe, Washington, in August 1998

This old truck was parked near the Mount Rainier Scenic Railroad in Elbe. I don't know if it actually had anything to do with the railroad or not. It appears to be a GMC CCKW 2-1/2-ton 6x6 cargo truck, used by the United States Army during World War II. The flat vertical windshield suggests this was originally an open-cab version from 1944-1945, with a solid roof and doors grafted on later.

Railfanning in Vancouver, Washington, in Summer 1998

Amtrak P42DC #120 in Vancouver, Washington, in Summer 1998

I took these pictures while railfanning with my dad in Vancouver, Washington, in the summer of 1998. First, arriving at the Vancouver depot with the southbound Coast Starlight, is Amtrak #120, a 4,250-horsepower P42DC that was built by General Electric in 1997.

Burlington Northern GP38 #2073 in Vancouver, Washington, in Summer 1998

Leading a northbound freight train past the Vancouver Amtrak depot, Burlington Northern #2073 is a 2,000-horsepower GP38 that was built by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors in February 1970. This locomotive was the second of six GP38s originally ordered by the Spokane, Portland & Seattle Railway and was intended to be SP&S #201. With the SP&S to become part of the Burlington Northern on March 2, 1970, these six locomotives ended up being the first locomotives delivered in Burlington Northern colors.

Burlington Northern Santa Fe Dash 9-44CW #4814 in Vancouver, Washington, in Summer 1998

At the railroad crossing at 39th Street in Vancouver, we saw a pair of brand-new locomotives. Burlington Northern Santa Fe #4814 is a 4,400-horsepower Dash 9-44CW that was built by General Electric in July 1998.

Burlington Northern Santa Fe Dash 9-44CW #4815 in Vancouver, Washington, in Summer 1998

Burlington Northern Santa Fe #4815 Dash 9-44CW is another 4,400-horsepower Dash 9-44CW that was built by General Electric in July 1998. These two locomotives were part of a group that were delivered in orange and green paint but without their yellow reflective striping and lettering, because Burlington Northern Santa Fe was in a hurry to place them in service. The resulting temporary look was reminiscent of the Great Northern's "simplified" paint scheme from the mid-1960s.

Burlington Northern Santa Fe SW1000 #3603 in Vancouver, Washington, in Summer 1998

Also at 39th Street was Burlington Northern #3603, a 1,000-horsepower SW1000 that was built by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors in February 1972 as Burlington Northern #378. Burlington Northern and Burlington Northern Santa Fe classified it as an SW10.

Willamette & Pacific #1801 in Rainier, Oregon, in Summer 1998

Willamette & Pacific GP9R #1801 in Rainier, Oregon, in Summer 1998

In the summer of 1998, the Portland & Western Railroad assigned Willamette & Pacific GP9R #1801 to work on the Astoria Line between St. Helens and Wauna, Oregon. This locomotive was notable for being painted in Southern Pacific's "Black Widow" paint scheme from the 1950s, but with "Willamette & Pacific" lettering. This locomotive had been used on the line previously, and my dad had taken pictures of it, but this was my first chance to take my own pictures of it as it passed through Rainier, Oregon, with a short eastbound train.

Willamette & Pacific GP9R #1801 in Rainier, Oregon, in Summer 1998

Built by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors in April 1959 as Southern Pacific GP9 #5830. (Interestingly, this locomotive was delivered after Southern Pacific had changed its locomotive paint scheme to Lark Dark Grey and Scarlet, and thus never wore the "Black Widow" colors while owned by Southern Pacific.) In Southern Pacific's system-wide renumbering of 1965 it became Southern Pacific #3693. On September 14, 1977, it was rebuilt at Southern Pacific's Sacramento Shops to a GP9R, and was renumbered to Southern Pacific #3855. It retained its original 1,750-horsepower rating after the rebuilding. Southern Pacific retired the locomotive on December 10, 1992, and it was sold to Willamette & Pacific on May 14, 1993. It was painted in the "Black Widow" colors in November 1993.

Thursday, July 5, 2018

Portland & Western #1202 in the 1998 Rainier Days in the Park Parade

Portland & Western SW1200R #1202 "Rainier" in the Days in the Park Parade in Rainier, Oregon, on July 11, 1998

On July 12, 1997, the Portland & Western Railroad, a subsidiary of Genesee & Wyoming Inc., purchased Burlington Northern Santa Fe's 91.7-mile rail line from Willbridge Junction in Portland, Oregon, to Tongue Point, near Astoria, Oregon (the line from Tongue Point to Astoria had already been sold to the City of Astoria.) On July 11, 1998, a locomotive from the Portland & Western Railroad was part of the Rainier Days in the Park Parade in Rainier, Oregon, and spent the rest of the weekend parked near Rainier Riverfront Park.

Portland & Western SW1200R #1202 "Rainier" in the Days in the Park Parade in Rainier, Oregon, on July 11, 1998

The locomotive was Portland & Western #1202. It was originally built by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors in October 1953 as a 1,200-horsepower SW9 for the Pittsburg & Shawmut Railroad. It was originally numbered #233, but was renumbered to #1774 and named "Ben Franklin" for America's bicentennial in 1976. Genesee & Wyoming Inc. purchased the Pittsburg & Shawmut on April 29, 1996, and this is one of four P&S locomotives subsequently transferred to the G&W's Oregon operations, and classified as a SW1200R. This locomotive was named "St. Helens" after St. Helens, Oregon, the city where most of the Astoria line's remaining business came from, but was temporarily renamed "Rainier" for the weekend.

Wednesday, July 4, 2018

Willamette & Pacific GP9R #1803 "Sherwood" in Rainier, Oregon, in June 1998

Willamette & Pacific GP9R #1803 "Sherwood" in Rainier, Oregon, in June 1998.

Admittedly, this is not a very good picture, but this is Willamette & Pacific GP9R #1803 Sherwood in Rainier, Oregon, in June 1998. This was the largest locomotive to run through Rainier since Portland & Western had taken over the line from Burlington Northern Santa Fe a year earlier. This locomotive was originally built by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors in January 1957 as Southern Pacific GP9 #5739. In Southern Pacific's system-wide renumbering of 1965 it became Southern Pacific #3579. On June 29, 1976, it was rebuilt at Southern Pacific's Sacramento Shops to a GP9R and was renumbered to Southern Pacific #3790. It retained its original 1,750-horsepower rating after the rebuilding. Southern Pacific retired the locomotive in March 1987, and it was sold on March 13, 1987 to the Louisiana & Delta (another railroad owned by Genesee & Wyoming like the Willamette & Pacific and the Portland & Western) where it was renumbered to #1752. In 1994, it was transferred to the Willamette & Pacific, becoming #1803.

Railfanning in Vancouver, Washington, in June 1998

Union Pacific C41-8W #9416 in Vancouver, Washington, in June 1998.

I took these pictures at the Amtrak depot in Vancouver, Washington, in late June of 1998. First is a northbound freight train led by Union Pacific #9416, a 4,135-horsepower Dash 8-41CW that was built by General Electric in November 1990.

Union Pacific C40-8 #9272 in Vancouver, Washington, in June 1998.

Following with another northbound freight train, Union Pacific #9272 is a 4,000-horsepower Dash 8-40C that was built by General Electric in November 1988.

BNSF C44-9W #713 in Vancouver, Washington, in June 1998.

Arriving with a westbound freight train from the Columbia River Gorge bound for Portland, Burlington Northern Santa Fe #713 is a 4,400-horsepower Dash 9-44CW that was built by General Electric in June 1997. This was one of the first locomotives to be delivered in Santa Fe's "Warbonnet" colors, but with small "BNSF" lettering on the sides. The lettering in the "cigar band" on the nose still reads "Santa Fe." Locomotives in "Warbonnet" paint were still fairly rare in the Pacific Northwest, but the trailing unit was even more interesting.

Illinois Central SD40-2 #6101 in Vancouver, Washington, in June 1998.

Illinois Central #6101 is a 3,000-horsepower SD40-2 that was originally built by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors in February 1976 as Burlington Northern #6709 under a 15-year lease agreement. This is one of 44 SD40-2s that Burlington Northern chose not to purchase when the lease ended, and it was retired in March 1991 and returned to the lessor. These 44 locomotives ended up going to the Illinois Central and having their dynamic brakes removed. The former Burlington Northern #6709 became Illinois Central #6101. 

Amtrak F40PH #369 in Vancouver, Washington, in June 1998.

Finally, arriving in Vancouver with northbound train #752 and the Talgo Pendular 200 equipment is Amtrak #369, a 3,000-horsepower F40PH that was built by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors in 1981.