Monday, February 19, 2018

San Francisco Cable Cars

San Francisco Cable Car #25
Photo by Cliff West
The first cable car system was built in San Francisco in 1873. Cable car systems continued to grow until the 1890s, when electric streetcars began to arrive. The 1906 earthquake damaged many of the cable car systems, and they were replaced with streetcars. The city tried to eliminate all cable car systems in 1947, however the issue went to public referendum, and the people overwhelmingly supported the cable cars. Over the coming years, cable car lines were shut down one by one, until October 1, 1964, when the San Francisco cable cars became a National Historic Landmark. They are operated by the San Francisco Municipal Railway

There are three operational cable car lines in San Francisco: the Powell & Mason line, the Powell & Hyde line, and the California Street line. These pictures were taken on the Powell & Mason line, at the turntable at the end of the line at Taylor Street. Though the cable cars look historic, they have all been extensively rebuilt in the late 20th century, though some original components are retained. Beginning in the 1960s, some entirely new streetcars have been built for the system, following the original designs.

Car #25, pictured above, was originally built by the Ferries & Cliff House Railway for the Powell Street line in 1888-1890 at the Washington-Mason carbarn. The Ferries & Cliff House Railway was merged into the Market Street Railway in October 1893, which itself was merged into the United Railroads of San Francisco in 1902. Car #25 was assigned to the Sacramento-Clay line before the 1906 earthquake and in 1907 the United Railroads transferred it to the Powell Street lines. It was renumbered from #525 to #25 in 1973 and was rebuilt by MUNI at the Elkton shops in 1976.

San Francisco Cable Cars #12 & #17
Photo by Cliff West
Car #12 was originally built by the Carter Bros. of Newark, California, in 1893-1894 for the Market Street Railway's Sacramento-Clay line. After the 1906 earthquake, the United Railroads of San Francisco transferred it to the Powell Street lines in 1907. It was rebuilt by MUNI at the Elkton shops in 1959 and was renumbered from #512 to #12 in 1973. This car was exhibited in Japan in 1987.

Behind car #12 is car #17. It was built in 1887 for the Ferries & Cliff House Railway for the Powell Street line by the Mahoney Bros. of San Francisco, who contracted with Burnham-Standeford in Oakland to build its cars. Assigned to the Sacramento-Clay line before the 1906 earthquake, the United Railroads of San Francisco transferred it to the Powell Street lines in 1907. It was originally numbered #532 and was renumbered to #517 in 1929. It was rebuilt by MUNI at the Elkton shops in 1956 and was renumbered from #517 to #17 in 1973.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Union Pacific CA-5 Caboose #25256

Union Pacific CA-5 Caboose #25256
Photo by Cliff West
Union Pacific CA-5 Caboose #25256 was built by Union Pacific’s Omaha Shops in July 1952 as #3956. It was renumbered to #25256 in June 1959. It was retired in September 1983 and donated to the California State Railroad Museum in Sacramento, California, in October 1983.

Southern Pacific Dynamometer Car #137

Southern Pacific Dynamometer Car #137
Photo by Cliff West
Southern Pacific Dynamometer Car #137 was built in 1926 by Standard Steel Car with dynamometer equipment and instrumentation from the Baldwin Locomotive Works. Designed to measure the performance of steam locomotives, it was assigned to the Motive Power Department but was also used for freight car testing. In the 1950s it was equipped with new instrumentation for diesel locomotive measurements. As measuring technology advanced, the car eventually became obsolete. It was retired in December 1975 and was donated to the California State Railroad Museum in Sacramento, California, by Southern Pacific in December 1979.

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe F7A #347C & F3B #347B

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe F7A #347C & F3B #347B
Photo by Cliff West
Pictured here at the California State Railroad Museum in Sacramento, California are Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe F7A #347C with F3B #347B coupled behind it. These passenger diesels are F-units built by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors and are painted in the Santa Fe's famous Warbonnet paint scheme.
Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe #347C is an F7A that was built in September 1949 as #39C. It was renumbered to #306C in April or May of 1971 and was leased to Amtrak in June 1971. By August 1973 it had returned to ATSF and been renumbered to #347C.
Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe #347B is an F3B that was built in January 1949 as #35A. It was renumbered to #307B in April or May of 1971 and was leased to Amtrak in June 1971. In August 1973 it returned to ATSF and was renumbered to #347B.

These two locomotives were retired in July 1975 and were donated to the California State Railroad Museum in March 1986.

Sacramento Northern SW1 #402

Sacramento Northern SW1 #402
Photo by Cliff West
Sacramento Northern locomotive #402 is pictured on the California State Railroad Museum’s turntable. It is an SW1 originally built by the Electro-Motive Corporation in 1939 as Western Pacific #502. Western Pacific sold it to its Sacramento Northern subsidiary in December 1965 and it became #402. It was retired in July 1981. When the Western Pacific was merged into the Union Pacific in 1983, the Sacramento Northern was merged along with it. The locomotive was donated to the California State Railroad Museum in Sacramento, California, by Union Pacific in October 1983.

Southern Pacific AC-12 4-8-8-4 Cab Forward #4294

Southern Pacific AC-12 4-8-8-2 Cab Forward #4294
Photo by Cliff West
Southern Pacific AC-12 Class 4-8-8-2 #4294 was built by Baldwin in 1944 and was retired in March 1956. It is the only surviving example of Southern Pacific’s unique Cab Forward locomotives.

Southern Pacific purchased two conventional 2-8-8-2 articulated locomotives from Baldwin in 1909, but discovered the smoke posed a danger to crews in the tunnels and snowsheds of the mountainous routes they were needed for. The Cab Forward design was developed to solve these problems, placing the crew ahead of the locomotive’s exhaust. The first 2-8-8-2 Cab Forward locomotives were delivered in 1910 and proved to be a success for the Southern Pacific. In addition to the 2-8-8-2 wheel arrangement, Southern Pacific also ordered Cab Forwards with a 2-6-6-2 wheel arrangement which were quickly converted to the 4-6-6-2 arrangement. In 1928, Southern Pacific purchased its first Cab Forwards with a 4-8-8-2 wheel arrangement, the AC-1 class. Southern Pacific ultimately purchased a total of 256 Cab Forward locomotives. All were built by Baldwin, and no other American railroad followed Southern Pacific’s example.

Southern Pacific AC-12 4-8-8-2 Cab Forward #4294
Photo by Cliff West
Southern Pacific #4294 was the last steam locomotive purchased by the Southern Pacific. It was in service from March 19, 1944 to March 5, 1956. Southern Pacific wrote off its last Cab Forwards in September 1958. Southern Pacific #4294 was placed on display outside the Sacramento, California, station and dedicated to the city of Sacramento on October 19, 1958. In 1967 it was moved to make room an Interstate 5 ramp, and was stored at Southern Pacific’s Sacramento yards until restored in 1981 and placed in the California State Railroad Museum’s Railroad History Museum in Sacramento. 

Northwestern Pacific Railroad

Northwestern Pacific Railroad
Photo by Cliff West
This is the herald of the Northwestern Pacific Railroad, which ran from Schellville and San Rafael to Eureka on the northern California coast. Established in 1907, the Northwestern Pacific was initially jointly owned by the Southern Pacific and the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe. The Northwestern Pacific purchased its last new steam locomotives in 1922. In 1929 the Santa Fe sold its half to the Southern Pacific, making the NWP a subsidiary of the SP. The last Northwestern Pacific steam locomotive ran on September 20, 1953. From then on, the Northwestern Pacific leased locomotives from its parent, Southern Pacific.

I think this herald was on the tender of T-46 Class 4-6-0 locomotive #112, which was built by the American Locomotive Company in 1908. It was last run in May 1952 and was retired on October 31, 1952. It was donated to the Pacific Coast Chapter of the Railway & Locomotive Historical Society on June 18, 1953. Repainted in two-tone green, it was exhibited at Southern Pacific’s centennial display in Sacramento, California, in August 1955.  A restoration was completed on May 18, 1965, and it was moved to the California State Railroad Museum in Sacramento in 1978. It is the sole surviving Northwestern Pacific locomotive.